CATEGORIES Movies
There's never a dull moment when Bill Murray's around. He was in fine form at the Toronto Film Festival press conference for his new film, "Hyde Park on Hudson," in which he plays Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The funnyman was joined by co-stars Laura Linney and Olivia Williams, as well as director Roger Michell and writer Richard Nelson. All had great insights about the film, but we'll get to those closer to the movie's release date (December 21, 2012).

In the meantime, here's a highlight reel (of sorts) of Murray's funniest remarks. He had quips about everything from his lingering "revolutionary rage" to Helen Hunt.

On being carried around the set by actor Martin McDougall: I believe he's changed his name since he was asked to carry me around the set. I tried to just have salad at lunch but it really didn't help. He's about as heavy as Olivia [Williams] and about as tall as Minnie Mouse. But he's strong. And so he had the honor of carrying me around.

On filming in England: I tried to behave as well as I could. We were working with English people, and that's a test. I still have a lot of revolutionary rage. I just tried to put a damper on that. It was a difficult time for me.

On British food: There's the food over there, which we have to talk about a bit. There's movie food and then there's movie food. None of it's any good. But this gave us a reason to be homesick.

On the many women in FDR's life: It was like a henhouse. It was insane. These women are all barking at each other -- the mother, the girlfriend, the wife, the secretary and the maids. This guy was beleaguered. They were all after him. Thank God he had a dog!

On funny people Tom Hanks and Helen Hunt appearing in dramatic films at TIFF: Oh well, they can't get work. They have to do drama.

On the healing power of comedy: I don't hear people say, "I was feeling sick and miserable, and then I watched 'Shawshank Redemption' and felt great."

On the importance of sticking to the script: It's important ... if the script is good.

On what it was like being nominated for an Oscar for "Lost in Translation": You get dressed up in a tux a couple of times and you get to be on TV, which is sweet. And you can either win or lose. I later realized, even though I didn't know it at the time, I had gotten a little caught up in the possibility of winning, so shame on myself for getting caught up in it. But I had won a lot of the prizes, so I thought, well, it didn't seem unnatural that I would be rewarded just one more time. So when it didn't happen I was like, well that's odd ... an extraordinary number of people think that I won. I never try to say, "No, that's not true, I was just nominated."